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Noctilucales
Submission to the 2016 Land Art Generator Initiative design competition for Santa Monica

Team: Ricardo Avella, Andrés Tabora, Michael Henriksen, Carla Betancourt, Silvia Mercader, Laura Vera, Oriana De Lucia, Martin Von Bülow, Laura Vivas, Miguel Rosas (representing: Tabora + Tabora Landscape Architecture, ATA avella taller de arquitectura, WavePiston)
Artist Location: Caracas, Venezuela
Energy Technologies: wave energy converter (by WavePistonTM)
Water Harvesting Technology: reverse osmosis desalination
Annual Capacity: 4,200 MWh, less the energy used for desalination (up to 14 million liters per year)

Open spaces are essential for an urban environment to reach balance. They are a form of escape—a place to get away from the chaos of the city.

Noctilucales preserves the horizon line of the ocean—the clean and uninterrupted view, where the sea stretches out before you until it meets the sky. To compromise the horizon is to destroy the landscape.

WavePistonTM has developed one of the less visually obtrusive wave energy technologies consisting of a network of moving plates installed along cables. The movement of the plates creates hydraulic pressure, which is converted into electricity. All of the components are submerged in the ocean, making the system invisible from shore. Only the small anchored buoys on either side of each WavePistonTM string can be seen on the horizon.

Noctilucales has two main elements—the submerged wave power farm with 200 energy collectors, and an extension of the Santa Monica Pier, increasing the surface of public space and providing a secure area for the turbine/generator and desalination plant.

Underwater LED lights on top of each moving plate will cast a subtle glow at night. The energy collectors will be seen as a field of lights, producing a bioluminescent effect similar to the one created by natural Noctilucales in some parts of the world.

The hydraulic pipe runs along the breakwater to a turbine station on the new pier extension. The generator is made visible, with a glass wall built on one side to show the jets as they hit the turbine. In this way, people will follow the conversion process inside one of six green cylindrical structures. The system will supply electricity for the pier and the bioluminescent installation. The surplus electricity feeds into the city grid.

Some of the wave energy is used to produce fresh water with reverse osmosis desalination. With the kinetic energy of the waves, the cost of desalination can be greatly reduced. Instead of using pumps and motors, the ocean waves are able to naturally create the necessary pressures with the movement of the plates.

The desalination plant is transparent to demonstrate the process to visitors, and drinking water fountains along the new pier provide a first taste of the fresh water produced.

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Forests of Wind

Edwin Cheong
Designed for Site #2 in Abu Dhabi, between Saadiyat Island and Yas Island.


Design Submission for the 2010 Land Art Generator Initiative Design Competition

Artist’s descriptive text:
The idea of the landart proposal was to experiment with the poetry of making visible the unseen / uncommonly seen occurences.

To be able to “see” wind by day via the windmill kinetic movement.
To be able to “see” wind by night via the lighted spinning cups.
To be able to “see a dense forest” of “trees” in a desert climate.
To be able to “see sand dunes” on a relatively flat relief site.

The landart attempts to “de-materialise” the dune to create possible event spaces during the day and night. During the day, light canvases can be creatively stretch across its lateral tie cables to form shades while during the night, the public will experience being clothed under a “blanket of glittering stars.”


See www.flickr.com/photos/carlerfur/ for this and other videos of the artist’s work, including some constructed variations on similar theme

The “Forest of Wind” LandArt is proposed to be located at Site2 Abu Dhabi. The site is able to accommodate up to 8 modules, each being able to be added in phases. Each module measures around 198x198m and is arranged linear along the water edge. Each module have a density range of
1089 to 4356 “trees”.

Wind speed as little as 3.8m/s is able to charge the turbine. a wind speed of 8m/s is able to produce 414w of energy on each 48v load of windmill “tree”. While the LED will only need 14w at nightfall. The rest of the 400w will be distributed to the grid.

With each tree being able to produce up to 414w (from 8km/s wind), each module will be capable of producing 1.8mw of energy. The maximum 8 modules in the site will be able to produce 14.4mw to support some 8,000 households while glittering beautifully on the site like dunes of stars.

The mills of the “trees” rotates easily on windy days to turn the Permenant Magnet Alternator (PMA) Dynamo located at the shaft. During the day, the goldish brass convex surface of the cups provide a glittering effect to the whole “forest” as they spin. During the night, the cups’ concave surfaces containing low energy LED periodically “charges” the highly bright industrial strength Super Phosphorescent Paint (SPP), thereby giving the “starry sparkles” for the de-materialized dune. The already negligible energy spent on the LEDs is further reduced by the use of SPP.

The creative energy effiecient lighting combo of LED+ super phosphorescent paint works this way –
Super Phosphorescent Paint has an extremely bright glow in the dark paint. It is 5 times brighter than the popular green zinc-based glow in the dark products available in most department stores. Technically, it will continue to glow for days. After a 10 minute charge from 1000lx. It will have a glow of approximately 1000mcd/m2 for the next 10min. Therefore, in working with a led by alternating every 10 minutes, the landart not only saves on energy but has a pleasant light “change” display quality.

PHASES + “UPGRADABILITY”
+ The 8 modules of Landart can be implemented in phases.
+ The Permenant Magnet Alternator inside accessible shaft for servicing and future “upgrades” of more efficient alternators.

low-res version PDF of submitted boards

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Javier Sánchez Merina, Héctor García Pastor, Paco Ruiz Vicente, Halldóra Arnardóttir, Carlos Bausá Martínez
Designed for Site #3 in Abu Dhabi, on Airport Road near Masdar City.


Design Submission for the 2010 Land Art Generator Initiative Design Competition

Artist’s descriptive text:
For the past decades, huge man-made landscapes have become characterized by a static image of commodity that can only be recognized from a satellite view, like the popular Google Earth or the NASA World Wind.

Our proposal addresses the notion of landscape as communication of human activities. It is a project that instigates a dynamic look: A person participating in the landscape should be prepared to interact with it.

Hence we suggest a change in the observer’s standing point, a change to recognize a new indicator of time and scale in relation to the site and the earth in a worldwide context.

On the SITE 3, situated between the Airport Road Near the Masdar City Site, “Landscape as communication of human activities,” proposes this dynamic change to take place through human interests: art installations and music festivals, games and sport competitions, writing messages to loved ones, conferences… activities, which thanks to new technology, can be enjoyed on a global scale.

The project is the confluence of Communication, Space and Biomimetism.

COMMUNICATION
“Landscape as communication of human activity” lets free the imagination. We make use of sensors of movement, light and sound to connect to the outer world throughout a multi-pixel colour screen that can show an art installation, a spatial play of interaction, creative writing of non-lineal narrative…

This communication can be appreciated around the world and people are invited to interact with its message. Although an activity occupied only by 1m2, it would achive a global scale and multiply its audience. However, the change of scale is not only metric but also within its content and ways of transmission: the exciting final of the UAE Open, Federer vs Nadal, played with the CTRUS C1 ball technology, can be followed simultaneously at the place and on satellite as a tennis strategy board; the lecture STRANDBEEST at TED will be a walk accompanying Theo Jansen’s works while the landscape becomes a text; a concert would transform the site into a festival of colours.
New geographic information programmes will evolve and show life on-line, not merely static images of past events. The aim is to have people experience things together, regardless of their location.

SPACE
Arab architecture has been a continuous lesson of modernity, yet now forgotten by many: The space in the Mosque of Córdoba is defined by columns, organised in an abstract mesh that dissolves the concept of axial and limited space. The resulting vistas of columns and arcades create a mysterious space.

Echoing this “stone forest”, our inner space is created by 34 structures of Carbon Fibre Composites. An interior landscape of 40m tall columns generates a network relationship and different activities that together give a sense of unity. Organized in staggered formation (80x140m), there is enough space between them to arrange a football pitch. Thus, the landscape can offer several events at the same time.

The roof is made of more than 31.000 Sunlight Concentrators. Each concentrator consists of a parabolic dish, 2,5m diameter joined to another following a “Mocarab” pattern. Under this roof, the inner space makes up a landscape of 170.000m2, having the qualities of being fresh, protect from the sun, and with reduced humidity: An ideal surface full of possibilities.

The structures’ elevation follows fractal geometry, from the trunk to the concentrators, which enables a maximum coverage to be achieved through the economy of the material and its repetitive construction. Each structure includes:

• Touch Screens attached to the sides of the trunks, ground level. From the interior, the audience will see the effects of their actions reflected on the inferior side of the roof.

• Lavatories and storage areas are inside the trunks (rhombus 6,80×6,80m), ground level. A storage water tank is located inside each trunk.

• Water Atomizers are installed inside the trucks to reduce the temperature by 10ºC.

• Sensors of movement, light and sound in the “branches” of the structure send the message of change, according to the human activity taking place.

• The branches incorporate draining system that collects condensed water in the roof to be recycled in the building.

• The Sunlight Concentrators that build up the multi-pixel landscape of rapidly changing colours can be used as educational facility, drawing people together around the world to learn about the new technology.

BIOMIMETISM
This project is a step into learning from natural mechanisms: the Baobab Tree. The way it recollects water and storages it, its photosynthesis, radiation of heat, distribution of liquids, allowing the wind to pass without frictions, provoking breeze…
Our collaboration with a specialist in Ecological Technology has carried out a research on design with the following achievements:

• Chameleon-like, its surface changes colour: The use of Electrochromic paints permits our Sunlight Concentrators to change colour. Opalux Inc. offers us their electrically activated technology that, based on the diversity of colours offered by the opal stone, utilizes structured photonic crystals to produce devices that can be electrically tuned to reflect any colour in the visible, UV, or IR spectrum.

When a voltage is applied, the active polymer increases or decreases in size, and this dimensional change will shift the frequencies of light that are reflected from the material. In this way the concentrators can reflect any colour in the visible spectrum, depending on the voltage applied, being in any case very low power requirements (<1,5 Volts, microamp currents). • Leave-like, its crown transforms sun light into energy: By concentrating sunlight onto a small area of high-efficiency solar cell material, SolFocus Inc. systems dramatically reduce the amount of expensive and often supply-constrained solar material used in the system. Our collaboration has developed towards providing high-energy output and maximum energy production per area of land. The results of 31.492 Sunlight Concentrators with parabolic shape of 2,5m diameter are enough to provide power to 6.220 homes in the UAE. The energy consumption in the production of SolFocus CPV systems is the lowest of all solar technologies, reaching only 22gCO2eq/kWh. In terms of Water Consumption, SolFocus CPV systems do not consume water in the electricity generation process because they are passively cooled; water is only used for panel cleaning, a water that will proceed from condensation. • Cactus-like, its appendixes provoke condensation: Due to the high relative humidity, the dew point is close to the current air temperature. At night, the parabolic dishes will act as cold spines that collect the condensation water in both of their sides. Although the rainfall in Abu Dhabi is very small, it is important also to collect and store the water of the few rainy days along the year. • Flat Bones-like, its skin gets reinforced. Composite provides “green” alternative to traditional building materials. The total life cycle assessment of composite material can place it above traditional products, under green building initiatives in Energy and Environmental Design. When the amount of energy consumed to produce, install and maintain a composite structure is taken into consideration, it uses far less than other traditional materials. The lightweight composite as a building material contributes to overall savings due to lower transportation costs, faster construction, less dead weight requiring smaller and lighter building structural requirements, and lighter lifting equipment. It is also resistant to rust, rot and corrosion. By doubling the useful lifespan compared to other products, composite’s durability reduces the need for replacement, repair or repainting; it is a low conductor of heat, fire-retardant, virtually maintenance free, and the strongest material available per unit of weight. Our collaboration with Carbon Fiber Manufacturing is in the line of working with BioResins, using soybean and corn feedstocks to replace the oil and natural gas derivatives. Much work of this project will be accomplished by moving towards natural materials and the use of recycled thermoplastics as a reinforcement. low-res version PDF of submitted boards

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Fallen Leaves

arsprogetti
Laura Nicolini, Daniele Fanciullacci, Patrizia Barucco
Designed for Site #3 in Abu Dhabi, on Airport Road near Masdar City.


Design Submission for the 2010 Land Art Generator Initiative Design Competition

Artist’s descriptive text:
The installation is the result of choices between artistic sensitivity and architectural culture, as well as of technical and scientific competence.

The artistic project was inspired by Master Marco Gastini’s work. Gastini in born in Turin in 1938. His works and installations have been exhibited in many museums and galleries worldwide. The leitmotiv of his artistic activity is the inspiration from stratification and to the “fossil” essence of objects. In his installations the key factor is the desire to create tensions.

The idea of this intervention is to create an artistic installation inspired by the local organic world and, at the same time, able to communicate the contemporary language of architecture. In this installation nature inspires artifice. Between “natural” and “artificial” a series of matches and dependencies are created, which create mutual constraints.

Therefore, the guidelines of the composition were:

1) TO CATCH THE PECULIARITIES OF THE SITE;
2) TO DEFINE THE SITE THROUGH ARCHITECTURAL ELEMENTS SUGGESTED BY NATURE;
3) “[…]TENSIONS, STRATIFICATIONS AND SEEMING CASUALITY TO DEFINE THE RELATIONS BETWEEN DIFFERENT ELEMENTS […]” by M. Gastini.

Concepts and elements of the new landscape redrawn in modern terms:

We wanted to enhance the desert character of the place, reshaping the area with three big dunes, on which there are some installations made by elements in tension between them.

These dunes are scenic platforms where visitors can gaze at the new landscape during day and in particular during night.

Groups of “fallen” leaves lied down on each dune are sustained by a complex structure, that looks like the mimetic insects.

There are also long sticks, lied down in apparent randomness, used to assemble the different parts of the reshaped site and they are suitable sheltered paths, through which you can reach the installations placed on the top of the dune.

Characteristics and material of the installation elements:

The “leaves” are photovoltaic ceiling made with two different types of photovoltaic technologies:

1. Middle: polycrystalline silicon photovoltaic panels particularly dimensioned; and
2. Around: textile Sunshade.

These leaves shade the place on which they lay and they allow the complete use for different aims: temporary expositions, teaching activities and at the same time they serve as locations for movies or spots, fashion shows, trading activities and more.

The centre of the leaves:

– The leaves are sustained by structural backs in corten steel with beams. This complex structure is tested by a tension analysis.
The corten steel allows wide flexibility in the choice of support points and the structural development and it has the merit to be particularly resistant to corrosion. It appears from the outset in a color “copper-burnished”, which is an excellent placement for a chromatic insert in the landscaping.

– The whole structure is further tightened by special “light bolts” with steel core. These are the most surprising elements, both for their illumination and coloration mode that give a particular night impression to the site. They light up thanks to a technology that combines the use of L.E.D. (Light-Emitting Diode) and L.E.P. (Low Emissivity luminescent Polymers, used in the coating of “light bolts”).

– The covered walkways are designed with metal frame and bricks particularly shaped to the arched roof for the sunscreens that allow to filter light and wide visibility. The entire surface area is coated with CIGS Thin Film Material.
These pathways are lit at night with an intense blue light produced with LED technology.

The installation achieves an overall height of 32 m, remaining well below the 55 m max. It is never lowers below the actual level of the soil and does not create problems to the aquifer.

The modeling of soil use only local sand: in this way the visual impact is limited and increases the contextualization of art installation.

The materials used for the installations are:

CorTen steel
Prefabricated bricks elements
PV modules
Textile Sunshade
CIGS Thin Film Material

low-res version PDF of submitted boards

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Solarbird

Miroslaw Struzik, Tadeusz Zdanowicz, and Kazimierz Kociolekhev
Designed for Site #1 in Dubai, near Ras al Khor Wildlife Sanctuary.


Design Submission for the 2010 Land Art Generator Initiative Design Competition

Artist’s descriptive text:
Solarbird is a three dimensional form. It is a structure composed of modules. The main dominating element is a vertical structure. It is accompanied by a horizontal structure, also consisting of the identical modules. Each module is a spatial form with a characteristic soft surface deflection and waving shapes.

The dominating vertical element 75 meters high is square to the motorway axis and thus can be seen by the drivers, even from a distance. In this way it can become a recognizable sign before entering the city. The installation as a whole is a readable, aesthetically sublimed form, referring to the ornamentation derived from Islamic culture.

The design takes into account a motorway exit to a viewing platform that is raised 10 meters above the ground level. The visitor gets the developing views of new forms lighted up by the sunlight. It is the clear impression of flushing birds. A shade of these forms casted onto a desert sand suggests an outline of a tree.

The structures consisting of the precise, multiplied modules, illuminated at night will give the specific show of changing effects, from red through blue to dominating green – casted against the background of the sky.

The particular quality of the installation is the usage of the specific shape module. It enables constructing such structures that bring to mind various associations, depending on the viewpoint, e.g.sea waves (horizontal structure),birds, fish and a tree (vertical structure) etc.

Solarbird combines thus the artistic concept with an attention to details. Solarbird captures energy from nature (the sun) and converts it into electricity


scale model of structural form

low-res version PDF of submitted boards

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i/green

Maria José Zapiain Gonzalez and Rodrigo Segura
Designed for Site #2 in Abu Dhabi, between Saadiyat Island and Yas Island.

land art generator
Design Submission for the 2010 Land Art Generator Initiative Design Competition

Artist’s descriptive text:
The proposal is based upon the idea that small actions summed together can lead to immense and amazing results. A Set of structures made of thousands of small electrical generator windmills are laid out in such a way that seen from afar they create patterns of light: reflected form the sun during the day, and the light they generate during the night. Parallel to the spectacle of light, the windmills generate electricity that can be directed into the grid and distributed to the city.

land art generator

This makes the whole project a statement of the concept itself, even better would be to involve the inhabitants of the city to collaborate with the project, purchasing one of the windmills, making it even more clear that small acts can create great things.

land art generator

land art generator

low-res version PDF of submitted boards

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Barker Freeman Design Office
Alexandra Barker, Reid Freeman, Walter Shih, Michelle Nicholls, Scott Savage, and Lauren DeMattia
Designed for Site #1 in Dubai, near Ras al Khor Wildlife Sanctuary.

Land Art Generator Initiative
Design Submission for the 2010 Land Art Generator Initiative Design Competition

Artist’s Descriptive Text
Our project seeks to bring to the forefront the incredible potential for natural resources to produce energy and fuel through processes that minimize their impact on the environment. Our intervention aims to generate a spatially and chromatically variegated landscape that endeavors to engage, protect, and even restore the natural biodiversity of native plants and animals. The proposal is organized as layered fields of photoresponsive energy generation systems that are also iridescent, phosphorescent surfaces intersected by a system of viewing platforms.

Our strategy employs local, renewable materials and resources—native algae and vegetation, recycled glass and low-tech methods of construction—to reshape the existing site into a colorful textured landscape. Modular solar collectors with parabolic trough mirrors and lightweight composite structures are made of a high quantity of recycled content. The units are designed and configured in accordance with leading examples of solar electric generation systems that successfully operate in North American desert environments. The components are then layered with iridescent coatings that reflect different fragments of the visible light spectrum. Observation towers constructed of the same material are fitted with convex mirrored reflectors to present views of the landscape on the ground and shaded viewing platforms to enable visitors to birdwatch and to observe the iridescent landscape and surrounding cityscape from an elevated vantage point.

Land Art Generator Initiative

Algae Farm: A system of open saltwater ponds supports the growth of algae for biofuel production. Oils are extracted from the algae and converted to biofuel via photosynthesis, with a per-acre optimal yield of up to 10,000 gallons of oil per acre. The carbohydrate content in algae can be fermented into bioethanol and biobutanol. The north edges of the ponds are formed by retaining walls with niches for bird nests, while the south edges slope up to grade. Sandbag berms subdivide the ponds into smaller populations of algae to allow for greater control, better maintenance, and more variety of algae species to capitalize on the varied visual effects they produce in response to light. The open algae pond system is also intended as a means to attract bird species to support the goal of attracting and engaging the adjacent wildlife sanctuary.

Mogul Field: The Power Station, Algae Processing Center and Visitors Center are embedded in the mogul berms toward the south that also conceal traffic and industrial park from view. The moguls begin at the southern edge of the site and gradually invert to become ponds as the pattern moves north. The shoreline is elongated and wrapped into the interior of the site to interlock the water and land together.

Chromatic Phosphorescent Waterscape: Different species of algae produce different spectacular colors, and some species have phosphorescent properties that allow them to emit light at night. Water jets would be embedded to spray the pond surface to produce phosphorescent effects after dark.

Land Art Generator Initiative

Solar Energy Collection System: Our proposed collection system is derived from solar energy generating systems (SEGS), a series of parabolic trough power plants in the Mojave desert at Kramer Junction, California, where solar collectors focus sun rays on an oil-filled heat transfer tube network that transports the energy to an onsite power conversion subsystem. The one we are using as a precedent is about 230,000 square meters and produces about 150 megawatts of electricity at optimum operating conditions.

Iridescent Field: The reflectors are configured as parabolic sections that are paired and broken at one-third their length into two sections. The two sections vary height and angle to respond to requirements for views and shading, but primarily maintain the optimal 20 degree angle for solar collection. The reflector surface is coated with thermochromic microcapsules derived from Hypercolor technology that change color depending on temperature to broadcast “hot spots” of energy collection when viewed from above, while phosphorescent paint will allow the surface to emit a glow at night. The reflector structure is coated with Chromaflair that changes color as one moves along it. Chromaflair is comprised of flakes applied in layers of aluminum and chromium that act like a prism, interfering with the refraction of light to produce color effects. The reflector structure is to be constructed as a carbon fiber composite or alternatively steel or aluminum. The joint between the larger and smaller reflector supports has an oval bolt hole that creates a slip joint, allowing each component to translate and rotate in a limited range of motion.

Land Art Generator Initiative

Bird Hide: The reflector structures are distributed along a series of control lines that follow paths through the site. The components translate and rotate to frame views of the city and the adjacent sanctuary. They also generate a bird hide and blind system for wildlife observation that obscures observers from detection.

VIEWING PLATFORMS
The viewing platforms are tiered fabric-covered raked platforms that afford the visitor the ability to see the polychromatic and phosphorescent effects of the solar field and algae ponds and the spectacular cityscape beyond. The platforms are supported by a network of crossing angled carbon fiber members and are reachable by a winding stair. The structure is clad with angled parabolic mirrored panels with a convex orientation that reflect the surrounding landscape down to visitors on the ground. The panels are attached at two points so they have the ability to pivot in response to wind. They are perforated as they reach the top of the structure and become guardrails for the platforms.

Land Art Generator Initiative

The environment for the proposed algae farm is ideal. Algae is naturally occurring in the climate of Dubai and is typically seen as harmful to fish and plants, although it is a staple of the flamingo’s diet. The algae ponds will be controlled and separated from the Dubai Creek by a series of concrete retaining walls and recycled-glass-filled-sandbag berms that will encourage the growth of native vegetation. This constructed groundscape should provide an appealing source of food that encourages the local waterfowl to mate and nest. Bird hides lining the northern edges of the ponds and dispersed viewing platforms are designed to conceal watching tourists from the view of the birds.

Land Art Generator Initiative

The climate of Dubai is humid subtropical, with extremely hot, windy and dry summers of an average high around 104 degrees Fahrenheit. The high levels of insolation in this region and the site’s proximity to major urban areas make this a prime location for solar energy harvesting. The reflector system we are proposing was developed for a very similar climate and has proven to be a highly efficient technology with a capacity factor of 21% with minimal impact on the site, producing virtually no emissions, and consuming no fuel other than sunlight.

low-res version PDF of submitted boards

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Hybrid Ecology

Andrew Snow, Ryan Nelson, and Houtan Pour-Tavakoli
Designed for Site #1 in Dubai, near Ras al Khor Wildlife Sanctuary.

Land Art Generator Initiative
Design Submission for the 2010 Land Art Generator Initiative Design Competition

Artist’s descriptive text:
The “Hybrid Ecology” proposal presents itself as a hybrid ecosystem, blurring the line between nature and artifice. An artificial environment is created to intensify the natural landscape over time and fully integrate the Land Art competition with the existing Ras Al Khor Sanctuary.

The project consists of a boardwalk meandering through a forest of super-scaled artificial plant-like objects, interspersed with sea water greenhouses that intensify the nature of the site. This obvious division between real and fake, inside and out is blurred as the artificial flora provide a great deal of very natural functions; they are the framework that supports plants started in the greenhouse, some plants act as information screens, other are bird hides, bird nests and feeding stations, and still others are equipped with solar panels that collect energy to provide glowing light throughout the night. The end result is a hybrid ecology that employs intensely artificial means to achieve a natural environment that is both familiar and alien.

Land Art Generator Initiative

“Hybrid Ecology” is a piece that will change from day to night, from season to season, and year to year, thus allowing viewers to return multiple times and experience the site differently each time. Spheres resting on their plant-like pedestals will collect excess energy from solar panels throughout the day, and use it during the night, allowing them to slightly rise and pulsate with light. Also, the plants in the greenhouse will eventually mature to the point where they can be transferred outside to grow on and around the artificial plant-like forms. In the beginning, an ecologically alien scenario will exist but, in time, native flora and fauna will “bind” to the site, resulting in a dynamic piece that warrants multiple visits.

The proposal refuses to perpetuate the excessive consumption of energy not only by local area residents, but by all of the first world. Instead of allowing this to continue with the provision of a new source of energy, it aims to prove that small-scale techniques can be used to provide energy for one’s own needs.

Land Art Generator Initiative

Similarly to the recent project in Oman, Hybrid Ecology uses sea water greenhouses to aid plant growth in the extreme desert climate. The premise is fairly simple. Energy is gathered from an array of concentrated solar panels (CSP’s). The energy collected from the CSP’s gets transferred to the four sea water greenhouses (the excess energy goes to the artificial flora). This energy gets used to intake nearby sea water and condenses it into fresh water, in the process creating a micro-climate suitable for growing crops. The greenhouses have been calculated to ideally produce 6.25L of fresh water/day/m3. The waste brine from this procedure is transferred to a recycling plant where it is turned mostly into gypsum, table salt and more fresh water. The greenhouses are envisioned as a rich tapestry of densified biodiversity, full of native flora and fauna, including an animal rescue centre housed in the final structure.

Land Art Generator Initiative

Hybrid Ecology is the complete integration of art, energy production and nature into a piece of work that transcends classification and becomes a place where nature and artifice combine to form the super-natural.

low-res version PDF of submitted boards

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Ryan Connolly
Studio of Associate Professor, Lisa Tilder, at the Knowlton School of Architecture, The Ohio State University
Designed for Site #1 in Dubai, near Ras al Khor Wildlife Sanctuary.

Land Art Generator Initiative
Design Submission for the 2010 Land Art Generator Initiative Design Competition

Artist’s descriptive text:
Symbiotic Ecologies are a juxtaposition of man-made and natural ecologies that will create energy beneficial to both. Visitors move into the site along boardwalks; first, over fields of fiber optic cables and then into bird filled meadows. An underground algae farm utilizes the light captured in fields of fiber optic cables to grow. When processed, its lipids are converted into biofuels that cleanly power Dubai’s built environment and its sugars are returned to the site in the form of bird feed.

In addition, natural shallow water, marsh, seacoast, and grassland habitats provide an extended home to the 7,000,000 birds that annually pass through the Ras Al Khor Wildlife Sanctuary. By enhancing the existing wildlife sanctuary with a new energy-generating art installation, this project seeks to become not only a global tourist destination but a model system of local energy creation and feedback, environmentally and culturally specific to the UAE.

ENERGY GENERATION
The project’s energy generating capacity relies on an underground system of algae farms. Sheltered underground, no excess environmental controls or conditioning are needed on the site to make it suitable for crop growth. Photobiotic reactors are used to grow the algae, which would be processed into biofuel and electricity. Fields of fiber optic cables on the surface of the site will collect sunlight during the day and pass it underground to the reactors. Combined with CO2 harvested from the air and waste water from Dubai, a harvest of algae can be completed in one to ten days, with a 100% yield capacity.

Algae can grow with saline water in desert conditions, produces 300x more oil than conventional crops, and grows 20-30x faster than traditional food crops. To be harvested, the algae is starved of its nutrients, separated into its constituent lipids and sugars by soaking in a solvent bath, the solvent is evaporated, and the lipids are converted into biofuels and their sugars are used as bird feed. The biofuels can be used to cleanly power Dubai and the feed is then redistributed across the site, attracting and nourishing the local and migrant bird populations of Ras Al Khor. Once its initial construction is complete, this project will coexist and symbiotically support the neighboring bird sanctuary. Truly clean energy should support Dubai’s built environment and preserve the natural environment and diversity that makes the UAE so unique.

Land Art Generator Initiative

TEMPORAL EXPERIENCE
Symbiotic Ecologies presents a seasonally changing temporal habitat, providing varying means of human and animal occupation. The northern portion of the site will be flooded by the nearby Dubai Creek, providing a year round bird sanctuary and feeding grounds. To the south, other areas of the site contain integrated fiber optics light harvesting fields and bird feeding systems. These areas will be gradually flooded in the spring and fall, with peak flooding occurring in the winter, to provide increased shallow water, marsh, seacoast, and grassland habitats for the large influx of migratory birds at this time. As more birds migrate, a larger area of the site is devoted to providing a habitat and feeding grounds. As they go, the site may revert back to generating energy for human consumption. When the habitable space for the birds increases, the area occupiable by man decreases, with certain paths only accessible during the summer, spring or autumn. People and birds co-exist in a proportional and symbiotic relationship, in occupation and energy production and consumption.

Land Art Generator Initiative

SYMBIOTIC ECOLOGIES
The fiber optic fields mimic the appearance of agricultural fields, the very impetus that allowed man to evolve, to settle in groups, and to found cities in the Fertile Crescent, not so far from Dubai. This form is fitting to propel human settlement into the post-petroleum age. As the product of intense technological planning, the optic fields present a disturbing and reassuring closeness of human intervention. As visitors plunge deeper into the site, more and more birds surround them. Technology fades away to a more comfortable, recognizable, and local ecological system. Conspicuously, it is man who is feeding and sustaining the bird populations. Visitors from around the world will identify mans’ position as primary benefactor and controller of the Earth’s resources and his/her need to maintain Earth’s diversity of species and habitats. Leaving the site, the visitor is confronted by a sea of technological melancholy. Equated, it appears as though it is possible for us to sustain ourselves and those who we shepherd on this planet.

Land Art Generator Initiative

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Takuya Onishi / LAUNCHPAD05
Designed for Site #1 in Dubai, near Ras al Khor Wildlife Sanctuary.

land art generator
Design Submission for the 2010 Land Art Generator Initiative Design Competition

Artist’s descriptive text:
An ordinary solar plant places solar panels and frame structures directly on the ground. The narrow space in between each row combined with the lack of shade and reflections create an unfriendly environment for human, animal and vegetation.

On a site where there is such beautiful scenery and indigenous vegetation, FERN solar plants are designed to gently sway at a minimum of three meters above the ground to provide cover from the sun and add to the visual beauty of the landscape. The FERN leaf/solar panel is a semi-transparent and flexible solar cell that gives a gentle light and provides a friendly space for all kind of animal and greenery below.

land art generator

FERN is designed to artfully follow the movement of the sun at all times. A flexible carbon fiber structure with a tension wire adjuster system achieves constant slow movement for following the sun at any position in the sky. A rotation motor for the PV leaf panels provides even greater accuracy.

land art generator

The stalk of FERN is made of material similar to that used for pole vaulting, providing a strong but flexible/springy structure that mirrors a natural plant stalk.

FERN leaf/solar panel is “semi-transparent and flexible solar cell on plastic and cloth” which was invented by Prof. John Rogers and his colleagues from the University of Illinois. This innovation gives a gentle, light and friendly lighting effect for plants and animals existing underneath.

land art generator

The site can accommodate 10,256 FERN units which would give the effect of an artificially forested park and would be a welcoming environment for visitors to enjoy the scenery and wildlife. While FERN casts wide shadows during the daytime, it gradually stands vertical in the evening and then lights up to the sky for the night as it slowly turns from the western to the eastern horizon to await tomorrow’s dawn.

low-res version PDF of submitted boards

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Milica Vlaov Tesic
Designed for Site #3 in Abu Dhabi, on Airport Road near Masdar City.

land art generator
Design Submission for the 2010 Land Art Generator Initiative Design Competition

Artist’s descriptive text:
Creating something beautiful and efficient is not an easy task. When we think about beauty that performs well, we firstly think about wonders of nature that amaze us every time we see them. Sometimes it seems people of ancient times understood better basic principles of nature. The Internet is big invention of our times and thanks to it, now we can reconnect with all the knowledge needed to create a sustainable society. By using broad knowledge of biology, vernacular architecture, Arabic culture and of course the latest technology, we came to this design. We called it Alshams or the Sun.

land art generator

As part of design process we were drawing and writing in sand. Arabic letters were blending beautifully, looking almost as nature creations. Since the Site 3 is close to the airport, out design could be seen by plane passengers. The design is like one of the lines in sand, flowing and forming the word Alshams (الشمس) the Sun.

An elongated tent takes the form of the word. Why a tent? Because of its light structure, its common regional use, and its function as it can provide pleasant shelter for people and families on picnic. This is a new interpretation of the tent. The form is modified and dome shape photovoltaic solar cells by Kyosemi are attached on the outer face of the cloth, covering an area of 20,500 m2.

As part of the letter ش (sh) tree wind towers are positioned to cool an exhibition space. The towers are divided (diagonally) on four vertical channels. Towers are oriented at 45° to the prevailing wind in order for larger area to be available to catch the wind and to minimize turbulence at its entrance. Through two channels of the quadrant air is moving into the tower and trough two opposite ones the air moving out of the tower (due to the pressure created in the bottom part of the towers). Usually in the afternoon sea breeze will create a nice cooling effect and the whole exhibition area will enjoy a nice microclimate.

land art generator

A plant native to Namib Desert, the Window Plant, is a dwarf succulent. A large part of the plant is underground and the top of this plant is semitransparent and contains chlorophyll. It protects itself from strong sun and still produces energy. Inspired by the window plant, the wind tower has an additional feature. On the top of the wind tower, windows are designed to allow some sunrays to go inside. Inside walls of wind tower are covered with mirrors and dome shaped solar cells. Glass of the windows is Sony dye-synthesized solar cells and some amount of energy is also produced by them.

Materials used are: concrete for support structure, rope as substructure, and locally made cloth as tent cover. By using new materials in concrete mix design concrete can became environmental friendly. Produced by natural mineralization process Calera materials (cement, aggregate) sequester CO2 from environment. Concrete made with these materials has zero carbon footprint while maintaining standard strength.

land art generator

low-res version PDF of submitted boards

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We would love to be able to create an entire orchard from the amazing solar ivy PV cells by SMIT. They combine solar generation with piezoelectric generators that create additional energy from the movement of the leaves in the wind:



Discovered via inhabitat



I have long thought about how beautiful an orchard of 100 (10×10) trees with PV leaves would be. The most beautiful place I can imagine to sit and contemplate is on the grass in the middle of an orchard. The sun makes such a beautiful tapestry of shadow on the ground and the multi-point perspective that the grid of trees constructs is ever-changing as you walk within. My personal favorite is an olive tree orchard with its tiny silvery leaves. Just imagine sitting in the midst of all that beauty while knowing that it is generating electricity. I figure an orchard that size would be enough to run more than a dozen homes. The above sketch is from an olive orchard on the Northern outskirts of Florence.

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treestructure_artek4
Beautiful work by Arteks Arquitectura. Now let’s hook those fake swaying tree sculptures up to some energy harvesting devices!

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Klaus Lackner, a physicist with the Earth Institute at Columbia University has proposed these beautiful carbon collecting “trees” as a remediation tool to bring down the levels of CO2 in the atmosphere. This would assist natural trees in turning back the clock, or at least slowing the upward trend of global warming.

Each one of these would have the ability to sequester 90,000 tons of CO2 per year, or about as much as is emitted by 15,000 automobiles.

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