News and Events » Press and Articles

LAGI Glasgow Receives the Nick Reeves AWEinspiring Award

Friday, November 11th, 2016

November 2016
Multi-disciplinary sustainable energy initiative wins CIWEM Arts, Water and the Environment Award

The 2016 award is presented to ecoartscotland and The Land Art Generator Initiative (LAGI) collaboration in recognition of their outstanding contribution to the field of environmental arts, including the LAGI Glasgow Design Competition.
The judging panel were particularly impressed by the practical orientation and ambitious scope of the initiative, which directly engages with management of the environment. They praised the multi-disciplinary structure of the collaboration, bringing together science, art, design and engineering expertise to tackle the transition to renewable energy in response to climate change, one of our biggest global environmental challenges. The open sharing of ideas and experience which is facilitated by the project will undoubtedly lead to an ultimate impact beyond the scope of the project alone.

The Nick Reeves AWEinspiring Award is presented annually by CIWEM’s Arts and the Environment Network in association with the Centre for Contemporary Art and the Natural World (CCANW). The award celebrates projects or practitioners who have contributed innovatively to CIWEM’s vision of “putting creativity at the heart of environmental policy and action”.

The 2016 judging panel consisted of representatives from CIWEM’s Arts and the Environment Network and CCANW. Special Commendations were also awarded to Tania Kovats for her exhibition ‘Evaporation’ and Chris Watson for his work as a musician, documentarist, communicator and sonic artist.

Dave Pritchard, Chair of CIWEM’s Arts and Environment Network, said: “The quality of nominations for this year’s Award was wonderful. LAGI and ecoartscotland’s work is a superb example of our belief that arts-based approaches offer massive potential for more intelligent ways of responding to environmental challenges”.

Clive Adams, Director of CCANW, said: “Such new forms of collaboration across disciplines are increasingly needed if we are to reach a more harmonious relationship with the rest of nature”.

Directors of The Land Art Generator Initiative, Elizabeth Monoian and Robert Ferry said:
“LAGI Glasgow shows how every development can approach early stages of master planning by recognising the natural energy resources that exist within the site (most commonly in the form of sun, wind, and ground/water source heat) and translating them creatively into features that can offset or reduce the need for externalised energy sources, all the while celebrating these climate solutions by making them attractive and engaging places for people.”

ecoartscotland said:
“We are delighted to share the Nick Reeves Award with The Land Art Generator Initiative for the LAGI Glasgow project. This is the art and environment award in the UK and highlights the important partnership we’ve formed aimed at stimulating more interdisciplinary and practical projects between artists, designers, architects and planners working with renewables both at the community and industry levels. Having the national recognition of CIWEM and CCANW is incredibly positive and will be appreciated by our partners – Glasgow City Council, Scottish Canals and igloo Regeneration.”

Glasgow and the Art of Clean Energy

Friday, November 11th, 2016

PROGRSS
Glasgow and the Art of Clean Energy
By Dalia Awad
November 2016

“Once a hub for heavy industry, the site known as Dundas Hill in Port Dundas, less than two miles from Glasgow city centre, still retains hallmarks of a manufacturing neighborhood. While the canals and locks surrounding the area are rarely used today, the architecture of a bygone age remains prominent – warehouses, factories and defunct chimneys dot the landscape, severed from the rest of the city by M8 motorway. However, behind these fading facades, a new breed of eager Glaswegian makers are breathing life back into the area, building upon its heritage.

Inside the Whisky Bond – a co-working space established on the site of a former distillery – artists and makers can take advantage of 3D printers and CNC machines to create their craft, while digital agencies and graphic designers rent offices in the upper floors. Up the road, at the Glue Factory, independent artists and performers showcase their latest creations in another former industrial site. Currently empty spaces surrounding the north Canal and Speirs Wharf are in negotiation to be redeveloped as student housing and, on an unassuming brownfield site, where another former whisky distillery once lay, Glasgow is soon to be home to the Wind Forest – a public art project comprised of 100 stem-like structures which are in fact bladeless wind turbines.

The winning design of a year-long competition by Land Art Generator Initiative’s (LAGI) Glasgow chapter, in collaboration with EcoArtsScotland, the Wind Forest will be implemented as part of the Glasgow Canal Regeneration Partnership – a private-public-partnership designed to revitalize the area within which Dundas Hill falls, and largely the catalyst behind the larger area’s recent resurgence as a creative hub.Founded in 2010, LAGI’s main aim is to inspire clean energy generation through aesthetically pleasing installations, proving that art and engineering professionals can not only coexist, but co-create innovatively.

“Art is a way to confront ecological problems,” says LAGI co-founder Robert Ferry, stating that he and his founding partner were inspired by American land art and how infrastructure can . “Science has always been grappling with a communication problem. Art in public spaces can solve that. It lets people run into ideas they weren’t planning to think about.””

Read More >

World Landscape Architect

Friday, October 21st, 2016

World Landscape Architect
LAGI 2016 design ideas competition announces winning teams
October 2016

“Every two years, the Land Art Generator Initiative international design competition provides an opportunity for creative minds around the world to reflect on the nature of energy infrastructures and what they can aspire to be in their built form. How can they integrate themselves into our cities in ways that enhance public space, educate, and inspire?

LAGI 2016 invited artists, designers, scientists, engineers, and others from around the world to submit proposals for large-scale and site-specific public art installations that generate carbon-neutral electricity and/or drinking water for the City of Santa Monica, California.

The LAGI 2016 design ideas competition, Powering Places, brought forward hundreds of proposals for civic artworks at the breakwater adjacent to the Santa Monica Pier to generate carbon-free electricity and water for hundreds of homes.

The 2016 design site offered participating teams the opportunity to utilize wave and tidal energies as well as wind, solar, and other renewable energy technologies.”

More here >

Anthropocene

Friday, October 21st, 2016

Anthropocene
Art That Delivers Clean Water & Power
An international competition challenges designers to show that clean energy production and dazzling public art can be one and the same
Photo Essay
October 2016

“Since 2010, the Land Art Generator Initiative (LAGI) has sponsored site-specific design competitions, soliciting ideas for public art that generates clean power. Its 2016 contest was the most ambitious yet. It called on designers to conceive of art installations that generate both clean power and water for the city of Santa Monica, California.

“Now, more than ever, energy and water are intertwined,” notes the organization. “As California faces severe water shortages in the coming years, the amount of energy required for water production and transmission is sure to increase.”

The contest’s coastal setting allowed designers to harness not only solar and wind power, but also wave and tidal energy. Its proximity to the Santa Monica Urban Runoff Recycling Facility provided the opportunity for integration with existing city infrastructure. Further, note the contest organizers, “we can challenge those who would disapprove of these important infrastructures on aesthetic grounds, especially at sites that are cherished for their cultural value and identity (like the Santa Monica Pier Breakwater).”

Here we present highlights from the competition. Learn more about the contest and the entries here and in Powering Places: Land Art Generator Initiative, Santa Monica.”

More >

Business Insider

Friday, October 7th, 2016

Business Insider
A set of ghostly, futuristic sails could help save California from drought
October 6, 2016
By Dana Varinsky

“Sails are one of the earliest ways humans seized the power of wind — people were using them to move boats across the sea even before the Middle Ages.

A new design aims to apply that ancient technology to modern environmental challenges.

Regatta H2O: Familiar Form, Chameleon Infrastructure is the winner of a site-specific environmental competition called the Land Art Generator Initiative. The design proposes to repurpose the iconic maritime shape to harvest clean water in addition to wind.

Regatta H2O — which was named the first place winner on October 6 — features a set of 44 sails made of a high-tech fog-harvesting mesh material. The sails would stand alone in the ocean (no boats necessary), where air is moist and fog is common. Veins in the sails’ surfaces would serve as moisture collection troughs, funneling the collected water to a central mast, which would in turn pump the liquid to a set of storage vessels on the shore.”

Read More >

GOOD.IS

Friday, October 7th, 2016

GOOD
These Stunning Designs Have An Earth-Friendly Secret
October 6, 2016
by Yumi Abe

“California has a serious water problem. In 2016, the state marked the fifth consecutive year of severe drought. Though the headlines have faded, the issue has not, and one group is putting it on full artistic display.

Land Art Generator Initiative, an organization dedicated to spark conversation, inspire, and educate the public through design, held its biennial ideas competition in Santa Monica, California, on October 6. The designs, submitted by artists from all over the word, must consist of a three-dimensional sculptural form that stimulates the viewer, generates clean energy and/or drinking water, and demonstrates a pragmatic approach. Designs— not to exceed 80 meters in height—must adhere to the constraints of the location plan and site boundary, must be safe for audiences to view, and must not create greenhouse emissions or pollution.”
Read More >

Yale Environment 360

Wednesday, October 5th, 2016

Yale Environment 360
Public Art or Renewable Energy? New Designs Aim to Produce Both

By Diane Toomey
October 5, 2016

As cities look to incorporate sustainable technologies into their infrastructure, a design competition is challenging artists and architects to create artwork that can both generate renewable energy and enlighten the public on environmental issues.

Read more —>

Inhabitat

Wednesday, October 5th, 2016

Land Art Generator Initiative Santa Monica winners address California’s energy needs and drought

by Lacy Cooke
October 5, 2016

The Land Art Generator Initiative (LAGI) has announced the winners for the 2016 Santa Monica competition. Drawing on technologies from fog harvesting to wave energy and transparent solar cells, the proposed installations would generate either renewable energy or drinking water for drought-stricken California. These “civic artworks” would be located “at the breakwater adjacent to the Santa Monica Pier” and are designed to inspire and educate the public on clean energy, the environment, and water issues.

Read More —>

Smithsonian

Wednesday, October 5th, 2016

Smithsonian
These Wild Sculptures Actually Generate Green Energy

By Emily Matchar
October 5, 2016

Regatta H2O, as the sculpture is called, is the winner of a contest sponsored by The Land Art Generator Initiative (LAGI), an organization whose goal is to “accelerate the transition to post-carbon economies by providing models of renewable energy infrastructure that add value to public space, inspire, and educate.” Since 2010, they’ve been hosting a biannual contest for artists to create public art that’s beautiful and generates green energy. Previous years have seen the contest in places like Dubai and Copenhagen; this year’s was held in Santa Monica, California, a part of the world deeply affected by climate change-driven drought.

Elizabeth Monoian and Robert Ferry, LAGI’s founders, say Regatta H2O, from Tokyo-based designers Christopher Sjoberg and Ryo Saito, stood out above the pack for using the “specific contextual features” of its Santa Monica Bay site in its design.

“By addressing the challenge of water infrastructure and recognizing that water and energy are inextricably intertwined, especially in California, the proposal has the potential to serve as a beautiful and consistent reminder of water’s importance to Santa Monica residents and visitors,” they say, in a statement written to Smithsonian. “The artwork is also ephemeral. It almost seems to disappear when the conditions are not right for fog harvesting. As a consequence, the artwork does not compete with the natural beauty of the bay and could be a welcome addition to such an historic and cherished landscape.”

Read More >

Garden Culture Magazine

Sunday, September 25th, 2016

Garden Culture
Aeroponic Farm & Desalination Plant Combo
By Amber
September 10, 2016

“Romanian architect Alexandru Predenu aims to supply fresh water and locally grown food to Santa Monica with an exciting new aeroponic farm and seawater desalination plant combination. Yes, there’s an abundance of fresh food available in California, the warm climate is perfect for year around crops. However, most of it is grown using water-hungry conventional farming methods. Obviously, in a drought-stricken state with a naturally dry climate, major changes are needed. Especially when agriculture is responsible for 80% of the water usage. The Ring Garden offers some interesting solutions.

A finalist of the 2016 Land Art Generator Initiative competition, Predenu’s design marries sustainable food production with a renewable source of drinking water for the City of Santa Monica. But it’s bigger than that. The aeroponic farm produces food for humans, farm animals, and it’s own energy… simultaneously. All of the structure’s functions run on solar power through photovoltaic panel collection, and energy created in algae bioreactors. It also harvests CO2.”

Read More >

Curbed Los Angeles

Sunday, September 25th, 2016

Curbed Los Angeles
Fanciful power plants envisioned off the Santa Monica PierCompetition turns energy sources into public art
By Jeff Wattenhofer
Sept. 23, 2016

“If we told you a power plant was being built off the coast of Santa Monica, mere yards from the Santa Monica Pier, you’d think Santa Monica leaders had lost their minds. But what if that power plant was also designed as a public art piece?

That’s the goal of the 2016 Land Art Generator Initiative, says the Santa Monica Lookout. The competition not only puts a focus on creating new forms of sustainable energy, it also challenges designers to add some artistry to the normally drab and foreboding appearance of power plants.”
Read More >

The Lookout (surfsantamonica.com)

Thursday, September 22nd, 2016

Mysterious Giant Orb and Other Renewable Energy Projects Proposed off Santa Monica Pier

The Lookout
by Niki Cervantes
September 21, 2016

Brilliant graphic shows surface area required to power California with 100% renewables

Thursday, September 22nd, 2016

Inhabitat features the latest LAGI information graphic: Surface Area Required to Power California with Zero Carbon Emissions and 100% Renewable Energy

Brilliant graphic shows surface area required to power California with 100% renewables
by Tafline Laylin
September 22, 2016

Oil Price

Tuesday, September 20th, 2016

Oil Price
Can Solar-Powered Floating Art Save California From Drought?
September 19, 2016
by Tsvetana Paraskova

Business Insider

Thursday, September 15th, 2016

Business Insider
This Solar-Powered Pipe Desalinates The Water That Flows Through It
By Dana Varinsky
September 15, 2016

The article includes more information from an interview with Aziz Khalili, one of the engineers on the design team along with Puya Kalili, Laleh Javaheri, Iman Khalili, and Kathy Kiany (Khalili Engineers).

Read More >

Seeker: Art Makes Clean Water and Energy

Sunday, September 11th, 2016

Seeker
Art Makes Clean Water and Energy
September 9, 2016
By Glenn McDonald

“The Land Art Generator Initiative is one of our favorite things. A bi-annual design competition, LAGI encourages the construction of public art installations that also feed clean energy into the local utility grid. Previous competitions have been held in Dubai, Copenhagen and New York City.

Inspired by the California drought crisis, this year’s competition in Santa Monica asked designers to incorporate a new twist — installations that also produce clean drinking water. When art meets science, interesting things always happen. Here we look at ten proposals from the 2016 LAGI competition.”

Read More >

Grist

Thursday, September 8th, 2016

Grist
Salty Talk
By Heather Smith
September 8, 2016

“Making seawater drinkable has never looked so sexy.”

Read More >

Fast Company

Saturday, September 3rd, 2016

Fast Company
This Solar-Powered Pipe Desalinates The Water That Flows Through It
By Adele Peters
September 2, 2016

“In a design for the Land Art Generator Initiative, a competition that calls for new energy infrastructure that looks like art, the engineers mocked up what the plant could look like off the coast of Santa Monica. The designers plan to build a prototype and prove that their technology is actually effective at desalination.”

Read More >

Mother Nature Network

Saturday, September 3rd, 2016

Mother Nature Network
Sun-powered desalination device transforms seawater into clean drinking water
By Matt Hickman
August 31, 2016

“You never know what kind of bold, bizarre and humanity-benefitting concepts the Land Art Generator Initiative (LAGI) will yield.

After all, the LAGI is the force behind a biannual design competition — motto: “Renewable Energy Can Be Beautiful” — that in 2014 introduced the world to Energy Duck, a semi-terrifying, solar panel-clad bird-monster roughly the size of a tugboat.

Like in years past, LAGI 2016 aims to solicit “human-centered solutions” that marry site-specific public art with sustainable energy infrastructure. Bringing together the creative and scientific communities, LAGI fosters boundary-pushing Franken-projects that function as objects of beauty and awe while simultaneously providing cities with a source of clean energy.”

Read More >

Can This Giant Orb in the Pacific Provide California with Drinkable Water?

Saturday, September 3rd, 2016

Architectural Digest
Can This Giant Orb in the Pacific Provide California with Drinkable Water?
By Leslie Anne Wiggins
September 1, 2016

“Santa Monica, California, is the 2016 site for the Land Art Generator Initiative, a global sustainable design event now in its fourth year. Because of the state’s ongoing drought, the current competition required that proposals include a plan for drinking water production. The winners won’t be announced until next month, but one of the standout entries is from a South Korean team who designed a 131-foot-diameter glass sphere that would sit out in the Pacific, beyond the iconic Santa Monica Pier.”

Read More >

The Guardian

Saturday, September 3rd, 2016

The Guardian
Fantasy art: the future of energy and water technology
Alison Moodie
September 3, 2016

“They look like designs from the pages of a futurist’s notepad, but the concepts below are all finalists in the biennial public art contest held by the Land Art Generator Initiative (LAGI). These ideas illustrate the possibility of marrying aesthetics with renewable energy and water technology and educate the public about the challenges of addressing climate change and feeding a growing population.”

Read More >

The Inertia

Tuesday, August 30th, 2016

The Inertia
Solar Powered Desalinization Plant Could Be The Answer to California’s Drought Disaster
By Alexander Haro
August 28, 2016

“It’s no secret that California is in the middle of a long, severe drought. It’s been five years now, and things aren’t looking like they’re going to get much better. Back in January of 2014, Governor Brown declared a state of emergency and rolled out a bunch of water-saving plans that everyone promptly pretended they were going use, then forgot all about and went back to watering their lawns. As recently as May of this year, he issued an order to continue saving water, but no one could hear him because they were inside the car wash. But despite the fact that lawns are still green and cars are still shiny in Southern California, the drought is a very real problem.

After a massive El Niño veered north and failed to drop as much rain in Southern California as expected, forecasters predicted that La Niña would show up this winter, compounding the problem. El Niño’s little sister, you see, generally means a much drier winter than normal–which is not what Southern California’s parched, cracking earth needs. But a Canadian Engineering firm might’ve come up with a beautiful solution: a desalinization plant unlike any other. Simply called “The Pipe,” it’s a solar-powered design that is capable of making over a billion gallons of fresh water from the sea.”

Read More >

designboom

Tuesday, August 30th, 2016

designboom
clear orb sculpture provides energy and drinkable water for the city of santa monica
August 29, 2016
By Nina Azzarello

“For the 2016 land art generator initiative, a team of designers from south korea has conceived ‘clear orb’ as a proposal for sustainable infrastructure in santa monica, california. the 40-meter diameter glass sphere produces fresh water from the sea, and provides energy to the city’s electrical grid.

laesik lim, ahyoung lee, jaeyeol kim, and taegu lim have designed ‘clear orb’ to appear as if it is floating on the surface of the ocean. while a translucent glass upper half refracts impressions of the surrounding landscape, the lower hemisphere’s reflective, mirror-like surface glitters in the sunlight. the installation is accessible from the santa monica pier, where a pathway subtly slopes below the surface of the water. the exterior walls of this ‘contemplation walk’ act as a wave power generator installed along the existing breakwater. the path’s interior walls are lined with a list of extinct animals, offering an opportunity to contemplate how humans might better co-exist with nature.”

Read More >

Real Clear Life

Tuesday, August 30th, 2016

Real Clear Life
Solar-Powered Ring Garden Concept Produces Drinking Water and Crops
August 29, 2016

“California may have found an ally in its struggle to preserve its water supply: the Ring Garden.

Designed by Alexandru Predonu, the Ring Garden is a rotating desalination plant and aeroponics farm that harvests seawater, solar energy, and carbon dioxide to produce clean drinking water, food crops, and biomass for animal feed. Predonu’s design was a finalist in this year’s “Land Art Generator Initiative: Santa Monica” competition, and his visually striking concept might be exactly what California needs to curb its water use; as of this writing, 80 percent of the state’s water supply goes towards agriculture.”

Read More >

Architectural Digest

Tuesday, August 30th, 2016

Architectural Digest
Is This Solar-Powered Structure the Answer to California’s Water Crisis?
By Carrie Hojnicki
August 29, 2016

“California has a host of serious issues, ranging from budget deficits to earthquakes. Yet among the more critical concerns is the state’s ever-growing water crisis. Chief among those responding to this dilemma is the Land Art Generator Initiative, whose motto says it all: “Renewable energy can be beautiful.” The Initiative hosts a biannual competition, this year focusing on harnessing clean energy to ameliorate Southern California’s drought plight. Though the winners of the 2016 competition will not be announced until October, one design is already making waves: Khalili Engineers’ The Pipe, an elegant and low-impact means of harnessing the Pacific Ocean into safe drinking water.”
Read More >

designboom

Friday, August 26th, 2016

designboom
solar-powered ‘pipe’ sculpture generates 4.5 billion liters of drinkable water from the ocean
August 25, 2016
By Nina Azzarello

“this massive solar powered pipe proposed for the 2016 land art generator initiative by khalili engineers intends to desalinate seawater into drinkable fluid. the concept — a blend of artistic, technological and architectural properties — floats off the coast of santa monica, california ‘reminding us about our dependence on water and about our need to appreciate and value this vital gift,’ the engineers describe.”

Read More >

Giant gleaming Orb deploys solar and wave energy to make clean water for California

Friday, August 26th, 2016

Inhabitat
Giant gleaming Orb deploys solar and wave energy to make clean water for California
August 26, 2016
By Tafline Laylin

“”The sustainable architectural culture that aspires the coexistence of human, nature and the architecture itself” is a core value of Heerim Architects and Planners in South Korea, the team behind a sparkling orb designed for Santa Monica Pier. A finalist in the biennial site-specific 2016 Land Art Generator Initiative design competition, which promotes the uptake of energy-generating public art that informs, delights, and uplifts communities and visitors, The Clear Orb reveals a playful approach to holistic design. Using transparent luminescent solar concentrators, the installation is purportedly capable of producing up to half-a-million gallons of fresh water each year for California.”

Read More >

Solar-powered Ring Garden marries desalination and agriculture for drought-stricken California

Thursday, August 25th, 2016

Inhabitat
Solar-powered Ring Garden marries desalination and agriculture for drought-stricken California
August 25, 2016
by Tafline Laylin

“With roughly 80 percent of California’s already-scarce water supply going to agriculture, it’s crucial for the state to embrace new technologies that shrink the amount of water required to grow food. Alexandru Predonu has designed an elegant solution that uses solar energy to power a rotating desalination plant and farm that not only produces clean drinking water for the city of Santa Monica, but also food crops – including algae. A finalist of this year’s Land Art Generator Initiative competition, a site-specific biennial design competition that has inspired world-renowned designs like The Pipe and Energy Duck, Ring Garden is capable of churning out 16 million gallons of clean water, 40,000 pounds of aeroponic crops, and 11,000 pounds of spirulina biomass for livestock feed.”

Read More >

The Independent

Wednesday, August 24th, 2016

The Independent
The solar-powered sculpture that could desalinate 1.5 billion gallons of drinking water for California
August 24, 2016
By Tim Walker

“Is it public art, or is it a power station? This shimmering design for “The Pipe”, a finalist in the 2016 Land Art Generator Initiative (LAGI), is intended to blur the lines between the two. Imagined here as a floating installation off the coast of Santa Monica, California, the Pipe is an electromagnetic desalination device, powered by the sun. It also looks great on the horizon.”
Read More >

Solar-powered Pipe desalinizes 1.5 billion gallons of drinking water for California

Tuesday, August 23rd, 2016

Inhabitat
Solar-powered Pipe desalinizes 1.5 billion gallons of drinking water for California
August 23, 2016
By Tafline Laylin

“The infrastructure California needs to generate energy for electricity and clean water need not blight the landscape. The Pipe is one example of how producing energy can be knitted into every day life in a healthy, aesthetically-pleasing way. One of the finalists of the 2016 Land Art Generator Initiative design competition for Santa Monica Pier, the design deploys electromagnetic desalination to provide clean drinking water for the city and filters the resulting brine through on-board thermal baths before it is reintroduced to the Pacific Ocean.”
Read More >

Public Art to Generate Green Power

Saturday, August 13th, 2016

XXI Architecture and Design Magazine
Public Art to Generate Green Power
August 12, 2016

“Conceived by Dalziel + Scullion, Qmulus Ltd., Yeadon Space Agency, and ZM Architecture, Wind Forest is a permanent public art installation that uses an innovative form of wind power to generate enough electricity for approximately 300 dwellings.

The project will be an important part of the new mixed-use development currently being planned for 100 Acre Hill (also known as Dundas Hill) in Glasgow, Scotland. Beyond Glasgow, the project also resonates with issues connected with the reinvention of urban brownfield sites throughout multiple global post-industrial cities. The proposal has won the LAGI (the Land Art Generator Initiative) Glasgow international design competition that challenged participants to bring creative solutions for a clean energy infrastructure to a brownfield site. Wind Forest aims to transform the post-industrial landscape of 100 Acre Hill, with an enriched infrastructure that is based on ideas around technology, landscape and context. On the site, groves of bladeless wind turbines with different spatial, sensory and environmental qualities are planned. Hence, Wind Forest mimics the activity of a forest by absorbing energy from the passing wind, and distributing it to its diverse and connected community ecosystem.

Wind Forest works with the physical landscape of 100 Acre Hill, upon which one hundred 4 kW single stem-like wind turbines will be planted. A revolution in wind energy design, these stems have no blades, have no gears or bearings, are noiseless, and do not present a hazard to birds. Instead, they generate electricity by oscillating, resulting in reduced maintenance costs, reduced manufacturing costs, reduced transportation costs, and smaller foundations.”

Read More >

Bustler: The “techno-boreal” Wind Forest Wins the LAGI Glasgow Competition

Monday, August 1st, 2016

The “techno-boreal” Wind Forest Wins the LAGI Glasgow Competition
Jul 28, 2016
By Justine Testado

“The Land Art Generator Initiative competition proves once again that clean-energy design can be pleasing to the eyes. The LAGI competition challenges inter-disciplinary design teams to propose permanent public art installations that are equipped with the latest technological innovations in sustainable energy. Following successful competitions in Copenhagen, Dubai, and New York, the 2016 site was a new mixed-use development currently planned for Dundas Hill (or 100 Acre Hill), a post-industrial brownsite in Glasgow.

When it comes to wind energy, most people imagine rows of spinning wind turbines you’d typically find in the middle of a vast desert or a field. A team comprising of Peter Foster Richardson (ZM Architecture), Matthew Dalziel and Louise Scullion (Dalziel + Scullion), Ian Nicoll (Qmulus Ltd.), and Peter Yeadon (Yeadon Space Agency) created their own version of the wind turbine with their proposal, “Wind Forest”, which was selected as the winning commission. The other top-winning proposals were “Watergaw” and “Dundas Dandelions”.”

Read More >

LAGI Glasgow showcases new energy art designs along Scotland’s canal banks

Friday, June 10th, 2016

Inhabitat
LAGI Glasgow showcases new energy art designs along Scotland’s canal banks
June 9, 2016
by Cat DiStasio

“In its latest effort to showcase clean energy projects, the Land Art Generator Initiative (LAGI) has announced a new exhibition at the Lighthouse in Glasgow, Scotland. On display at LAGI Glasgow will be a series of designs for a proposed renewable energy project targeted for the banks of two intersecting canals in the city in the Port Dundas area. The creations were developed collaboratively by agencies in Scotland as well as from other countries, demonstrating something of a global partnership in support of renewable energy projects—with a certain aesthetic flair, of course.”
More >

‘Windforest’ plan wins out in Port Dundas energy competition

Thursday, June 2nd, 2016

Urban Realm
‘Windforest’ plan wins out in Port Dundas energy competition
May 31, 2016

“Situated on Dundashill, an area prioritised for regeneration by Glasgow City Council, the submission features a cluster of 13m tall wind turbines capable of generating electricity through oscillation and was one of three shortlisted schemes to be conceived in collaboration between artists, architects, engineers, scientists, landscape architects and urban planners.”
Read More >

Las Vegas Weekly

Thursday, June 2nd, 2016

Las Vegas Weekly
PUBLIC ART GENERATING POWER? MAYBE IN LAS VEGAS
By Kristen Peterson
June 2, 2016

“While sharing a bottle of wine and overlooking the indoor ski resort inside the Mall of the Emirates in Dubai, Robert Ferry and Elizabeth Monoian mapped out a plan for clean energy in the realm of public art. Both Carnegie Mellon University grads, Ferry, an architect, and Monoian, then an art and design professor at Dubai’s Zayed University, focused on site-specific projects that would bring together artists, architects, scientists and engineers to find aesthetic alternatives in harvesting clean energy. Four international biennial competitions later (Dubai and Abu Dhabi in 2010, Copenhagen in 2012, New York City in 2014 and Santa Monica in 2016) and operating as the Land Art Generator Initiative, they’ve turned their attention to Las Vegas as a potential site for 2018.”

Read More >

Plans to create electricity for Glasgow

Monday, May 30th, 2016

Glasgow Live
May 30, 2016
Plans to create electricity for Glasgow using rainbows and a massive dandelion, in Land Art Generator Initiative

The three designs aim to create pieces of urban art that also generate electricity.
Proposals which would see electricity generated for the city using pieces of urban art have been drawn up.
The designs, which include a water turbine that generates rainbows and a huge dandelion, have been created for the Landscape Art Generator Initiative. They will be going on display for public viewing at the Lighthouse in Glasgow next month.
The three designs aim to create pieces of urban art that also generate electricity.
One design put forward is called the Dundas Dandelions and is intended to be placed at Dundas Hill overlooking the city and adjacent to the motorway.

More >

The Scotsman: Designs for Urban Site Harness Power of Art

Sunday, May 29th, 2016

The Scotsman
Designs for Urban Site Harness Power of Art
May 29, 2016
By Alison Campsie

More >

THE FRONT LINE OF ENERGY

Tuesday, May 10th, 2016

We were thrilled to be included at Renewable Cities Global Learning Forum a year ago. They are now checking in with Global Learning Forum alumni in a series called “The Front Line of Energy” to find out what’s shifted in their work over the past year and to hear their thoughts on the future of energy.

You can follow this link to see the interviews. Read >

Robert Ferry and Elizabeth Monoian are the Founding Directors of the Land Art Generator Initiative (LAGI), which works to address the issue of public acceptance of localized renewable energy infrastructures by providing models of energy generation architecture that rise to the level of contemporary public art. Every two years LAGI holds an international design competition, which has thus far been held in Dubai, New York City, and Copenhagen, and is coming to Los Angeles in 2016.

Robert and Elizabeth believe that renewables are beautiful. Their passion was on full display at our Global Learning Forum where they delivered a compelling PechaKucha presentation, a gallery of leading energy-generating art concepts from their competitions, and a session called, “Aesthetics, integration, and building support for urban renewables.”

How did participating in the Global Learning Forum impact your work?

“For us, one of the biggest benefits was participating in the PechaKucha night. It allowed us to speak to a broad audience that included policy makers, mayors, and renewable energy developers. People then recognized us for the next two days of the Forum and engaged us in dialogue—new people were opening up to us. Shortly thereafter, we did another PechaKucha in Pittsburgh!”

What’s happened in your work over the last year?

“We’re proud to say that we’ve been awarded the J.M.K. Innovation Prize [the award supports social entrepreneurs across the United States who are spearheading game-changing solutions to our society’s most urgent challenges.], which has allowed us to solidify our organizational structure.

We are expanding greatly beyond our biennial design competitions. For example, we are currently in the process of working with a fashion designer to pilot wearable renewable electricity-generating technology with a Maasai community in Kenya. It’s a co-design process that will create a line of bespoke jewelry and other products with embedded solar. The designs will improve the livelihoods of the Maasai people and bring sustainable income to the Olorgasailie Maasai Women Artisans collective.

Our second Art+Energy Camp targeting low-income neighbourhoods will be taking place in Lancaster, California, and is modeled after our successful 2015 program in Pittsburgh. We are creating opportunities for young people to learn about the design of energy infrastructure and its impact on our landscape and environment. Following tours of nuclear and coal plants, a variety of renewable energy installations, and lessons about energy science and art outside the gallery, the students will take part in the design of a 5 kWh solar energy-generating public artwork that will help power a local community centre. The students have all been very engaged and a part of every meeting—with fabricators to engineers to solar installers.”

This year, our biennial design competition is taking place at a coastal site adjacent to the historic Santa Monica Pier. This offers teams the opportunity to design with wave and tidal, in addition to wind, solar, and other renewable energy technologies. The award event will take place at Greenbuild 2016 in Los Angeles in October.

In 2015, we worked with the City of Glasgow to put together a design brief and hold a competition to create a renewable energy-generating sculpture at a brownfield site as a part of a Scottish Canals regeneration project. The idea is to use the natural energies at a site as a form generator, creating a public park and infrastructural artwork that will be the cornerstone of the developer’s master plan. Three local practices—architects, artists, and energy scientists—were paired with a past biennial participant in an invited competition. The exhibition is taking place at the Lighthouse in Glasgow, opening on June 9, 2016.”

What have been some of the biggest developments and trends in renewable energy over this past year?

“For one, the number of renewable energy installations is outpacing conventional fossil fuels. The renewable energy shift is already occurring and the prices are dropping exponentially in the marketplace. The trend lines are amazing!”

How has this affected your work?

“In the design world, the cost of solar panels per square foot is now on par with any other type of high-performance exterior material. When design is done properly from the concept stage, there is no excuse not to incorporate RE, particularly with photovoltaics. While we’ve seen a lot of companies come and go, certain markets are getting more traction and we’re optimistic. We’re at the beginning of an explosion of opportunities, especially with flexible and thin materials with roll rooftop applications coming online.”

What are the next big issues to watch?

”We are concerned with the social impacts of some large renewable energy projects that can displace people—for example, centralized energy projects cutting off grazing land for the Maasai people of Kenya and Tanzania. The utility-scale electricity is going to the national grid to feed Nairobi and large industry, with nothing going back to the people whose lives are disrupted. They derive no economic or social benefit. We hope that renewable energy infrastructure planning can be proactively a part of solutions to socioeconomic issues as well as environmental issues. With the capital costs of installations going down, there is an opportunity for large projects to share the benefits. Likewise, decentralized renewable energy and energy cooperatives can provide energy justice solutions while increasing resiliency.”

A Vision of Clean Energy Public Art: LAGI Visits Las Vegas

Thursday, April 14th, 2016

Huffington Post
A Vision of Clean Energy Public Art: LAGI Visits Las Vegas
April 14, 2016
by JK Russ
“Rows of elevated solar panels rise up from the cacti garden in front of the new Las Vegas City Hall. At night the harnessed solar energy lights up a blue-toned electronic display on glass fins across the building’s façade. It’s the perfect venue for a presentation on the intersection of renewable energy and art by internationally renowned Land Art Generator Initiative (LAGI).” Read More >

Las Vegas Weekly

Wednesday, February 17th, 2016

THIS WEEK IN ARTS: ART CHANTRY, THE LV PHIL GUILD AND AESTHETIC POSSIBILITIES OF RENEWABLE ENERGY

Thank you Pam Stuckey at Renewable Envoy for inviting us to speak and to everyone who attended last evening’s discussion at Las Vegas City Council Chambers. The event received a very welcome notice in Las Vegas Weekly:

In 2010 the Land Art Generator Initiative held its first international design competition for innovative and art-based solutions to the renewable energy landscape. Teams from more than 40 countries submitted ideas and concepts, from sculptural wind turbines, solar pyramids and solar carpets to minimalist fields designed to harvest natural energy.

Tonight LAGI’s co-founders Robert Ferry and Elizabeth Monoian will be discussing the role of technology in art at the Las Vegas City Council Chambers. Public Art within the Urban Fabric of a Sustainable Future, hosted by Southern Nevada’s Renewable Envoy, is part of LAGI’s focus: Renewable energy infrastructures placed harmoniously within our urban and suburban landscapes through collaborations between architects, artists, scientists and engineers. Capture, convert, transform and transmit.

Tonight’s presentation comes amid LAGI’s fourth biannual international competition (held this year in Santa Monica), which is currently seeking innovative ideas for harvesting energy and generating clean water through May 15. February 16, 6 p.m. Las Vegas City Council Chambers, 495 S. Main St.